Recent Posts

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91
Language Questions / Re: last year, I planned to do something this year
« Last post by admin on March 10, 2022, 10:19:35 am »
Yes - that's fine. But I must point out that, in my old-fashioned British English, transportation does not exist in your context! It would be transport.
92
Language Questions / last year, I planned to do something this year
« Last post by bookworm on March 10, 2022, 06:27:08 am »
Let's say that Mike only uses public transportation to go to work, and he planned to buy a car last year. He lives in a country that is not that affected by the rising gas prices in the US, but the prices have only gone up after the war in Eastern Europe started.

- Last year, I planned to buy a car this year. But I've changed my mind after the rising gas prices this year.​

I just want to confirm if the highlighted sentence above is well written. In one sentence, you express that planning was done last year, and buying is supposed to be this year.
93
Language Questions / Re: call out
« Last post by Takashi on March 09, 2022, 12:25:03 pm »
Thank you very much indeed, Mr Baker!

I really appreciate your giving me example sentences, which enabled me to understand the meaning of the phrase much farther.

Takashi
94
Language Questions / Re: call out
« Last post by admin on March 09, 2022, 11:54:06 am »
Context is always important. For example...

The house was on fire last night; we had to call out the fire brigade.
My sister had a high temperature; we had to call out the doctor.
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Language Questions / Re: forced to patronize fixers
« Last post by admin on March 09, 2022, 11:48:41 am »
a - not good
b & c - OK but not current - far too formal
d - fine
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Language Questions / forced to patronize fixers
« Last post by bookworm on March 07, 2022, 05:24:29 pm »
Let's say it's really hard to set an appointment for a passport online. A local journalist has used the equivalent of the verb patronize in our language, as in:

a) Applicants are forced to patronize the services of fixers.​

These fixers can be scammers or legit (in a sense that you can get your passport afterward). I'm not sure of the sentence above, but I think the following are used by native speakers:

b) Applicants are forced to avail themselves of the services of fixers.​
c) Applicants are forced to take advantage of the services of fixers.​
d) Applicants are forced to use the services of fixers.​

Are all of the options above (a-d) correct?
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Language Questions / Re: the usage of smash
« Last post by Takashi on March 07, 2022, 03:22:55 pm »
Thank you very much, Mr Baker!
I really appreciate it.

Thanks to your explanaiton, the meaning is clear now.

Takashi
98
Language Questions / Re: call out
« Last post by Takashi on March 07, 2022, 03:20:05 pm »
Thank you very much indeed, Mr Baker!
I really appreciate it.

Could you tell me if this is a frequently used phrasal verb? Or should I think the meaning of "call out" is determined by the context here?

Thank you very much.

Takashi
99
Language Questions / Re: to beat (in experience)
« Last post by admin on March 07, 2022, 09:59:45 am »
Wow, you have outdone us with your travels!​
100
Language Questions / Re: the usage of smash
« Last post by admin on March 07, 2022, 09:57:22 am »
Yes it does. Over implies that the top of the head was where the item was smashed.
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