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Let's say the Jones and the Smiths are family friends. Both couples dream of traveling the world, but the Smiths decided to invest their money and postpone their travel plans. The Jones, on the other hand, invested some of their money and used part of it to travel within several years prior to the pandemic. The Smith couple has lots of money but regrets their decision since the pandemic started.

   Mrs. Smith: Why don't we travel together to Europe? 
   Mrs. Jones: It's only now that you are planning to travel? We'd love to, but we'd rather travel locally (within the state or in neighboring states only). It's too complicated to travel internationally now, and you could be locked down in one of those countries.

Please confirm if the italicized text above sounds natural. Otherwise, how would you express it?
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Language Questions / you (the customer) did not do this or that
« Last post by bookworm on Today at 04:31:54 pm »
Many people work in the customer service sector, whether by phone, chat, or in-person (stores, shops, etc.). Please confirm if it's true that direct statements like the following should be avoided when assisting customers:

   A shop owner explaining the issue to a customer (in-person): It's not working because you did not charge the battery. Let me give you a copy of the instruction manual.​
   Tech support to a customer (by phone): The link expired because you did not click it within 24 hours. Don't worry, I'll send you a new one.​

Instead, they should use passive constructions:

   It's not working because the battery was not charged.​
   The link expired because it was not clicked within 24 hours.​
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Language Questions / Re: regularization of employees
« Last post by admin on January 20, 2022, 09:59:18 am »
We would probably talk about a trial or, perhaps, probationary period.

After your trial period you will be entitled to the following benefits: health card, sick/vacation leaves, etc.
I'm sure you will complete your trial period in six months since your performance is very satisfactory.
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Language Questions / Re: hey, namesake
« Last post by admin on January 20, 2022, 09:50:09 am »
Just the name. If you need to make it really clear which person you are talking about you might use first name and last name.

1. Hey, James, have you seen my (public) post on [social media]?​

2. I forgot to send the fax to the client before I left. I cannot find the document now.​
   Don't worry. It was sent by your Peter (Smith) yesterday before shredding the document (with sensitive details).​
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Language Questions / Re: Oxford comma
« Last post by admin on January 20, 2022, 09:46:56 am »
I would say no.
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Language Questions / Re: Oxford comma
« Last post by Britta on January 20, 2022, 08:27:30 am »
Then: do I need a comma after the first interlock?
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Language Questions / hey, namesake
« Last post by bookworm on January 19, 2022, 09:18:01 pm »
When two people of the same name meet each other in school, workplace, etc., how do they address each other? In our language, we sometimes use a term and it sounds like the following:

1. James is addressing his classmate with the same name.

   Hey, namesake, have you seen my (public) post on [social media]?​

2. Jane is referring to Peter's coworker with the same name.

   - I forgot to send the fax to the client before I left. I cannot find the document now.​
   - Don't worry. It was sent by your namesake yesterday before shredding the document (with sensitive details).​

But I don't think native speakers use the word namesake that way. What do you normally expect to hear in that situation?
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Language Questions / regularization of employees
« Last post by bookworm on January 19, 2022, 07:16:07 pm »
In my country, newly hired employees are normally under observation in their first six months, and that is called the probationary period. They can be easily terminated for certain misdemeanors within that period.

If they pass that stage, they become regular employees on their 6th month until they resign or retire, depending on what's stipulated in the contract. Once regularized, they are protected by law and it is hard to terminate them, as there are certain procedures to be followed.

When I looked up the word regularization in the dictionary, I'm not sure if it is also applied to employees in other countries like the UK, US, etc. The following statements are commonly heard or read in the corporate world here:

   Upon regularization, you will be entitled to the following benefits: health card, sick/vacation leaves, etc.
   I'm sure you will be regularized in six months since your performance is very satisfactory.

Do you also use the highlighted words in this situation? If not, can you briefly explain the system in your region.
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Language Questions / Re: to maximize a status
« Last post by bookworm on January 19, 2022, 07:12:01 pm »
Thanks, Britta. But I realize that a single sentence may not be enough to express the idea. So it's always better to explain it using more than one sentence.
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Language Questions / Re: Oxford comma
« Last post by admin on January 19, 2022, 05:09:41 pm »
As I understand it, the Oxford comma comes after the last in a list of adjectives. For example: the old, grey, wooden, shed.

So... no!

https://www.grammarly.com/blog/what-is-the-oxford-comma-and-why-do-people-care-so-much-about-it/
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