Author Topic: healthier and stronger  (Read 668 times)

Offline highdeki

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healthier and stronger
« on: January 14, 2022, 08:22:09 am »
Mike's fans are getting healthier and stronger.

What's the meaning of "healthier(healthy) and stronger(strong).

The sentence is from my grammar workbook.
Originally,  you have to change the word or form in the sentence.

"Mike's fans was getting healthier and stronger." (wrong)
⇒"Mike's fans were getting healthier and stronger." (correct)

This quiz has only one sentence, so I don' t get the meaning of "healthier and stronger."

I was wondering if you could help me understand the sentence.

Offline admin

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Re: healthier and stronger
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2022, 05:18:07 pm »
I am not sure I understand your problem. The sentence is fine as it is...
Best wishes,

Duncan

Offline highdeki

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Re: healthier and stronger
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2022, 08:16:11 am »
Maybe, my English is so poor that you can't understand my question.
Sorry about that.

What I want to know is that "getting healthier and stronger" suggests that Mike's fans take exercise and they don't get sick?

In the sentence, 'fans' means the same meaning as 'baseball fans' or 'fans of John Wayne'. Am I right?

If so, Mike (a singer, or an actor whatever) has a lot of fans, and they take exercise every day?
I don't get the situation.

Offline admin

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Re: healthier and stronger
« Reply #3 on: January 17, 2022, 08:48:08 am »
You are right - and there is very little wrong with your English!

Fans can have a very wide meaning and can include fans of sports people. The original question was to turn "was" to "were" - the word fans is plural.

I hope that helps.
Best wishes,

Duncan

Offline highdeki

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Re: healthier and stronger
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2022, 02:49:53 pm »
Turning "was" into "were" is very easy for me.
However, I was wondering when in the world you use the phrase.

?Mike's fans are getting healthier and stronger.?

I suppose that Mike (a famous man) goes to the hospital where his fans are, and say ?Surprise!?
Then the fans are getting better and better...
Something like that?

The sentence has no context. I don?t come up with another story.

Offline admin

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Re: healthier and stronger
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2022, 07:59:05 pm »
There are probably more of them and their voice is getting stronger.
Best wishes,

Duncan

Offline Britta

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Re: healthier and stronger
« Reply #6 on: January 19, 2022, 10:50:15 am »
Turning "was" into "were" is very easy for me.
However, I was wondering when in the world you use the phrase.

?Mike's fans are getting healthier and stronger.?

I suppose that Mike (a famous man) goes to the hospital where his fans are, and say ?Surprise!?
Then the fans are getting better and better...
Something like that?

The sentence has no context. I don?t come up with another story.
I was guessing that Mike is an influencer, may be specialising in sports or health issues (healthy eating etc.) or maybe he's a sports idol. His fans want to be like him so they mimic his behavior, training hard and eating healthy stuff.
If it's not used by a native speaker it's not idiomatic. And idiom trumps grammar every time. Jack Wilkerson