Author Topic: you might fail  (Read 311 times)

Offline navi

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you might fail
« on: November 12, 2021, 10:37:05 am »
Which are correct:

1) If Tom had not helped you with your math problems yesterday, you would probably fail your exam tomorrow.

2) If Tom had not helped you with your math problems yesterday, you would have probably failed your exam tomorrow.

3) If Tom had not helped you with your math problems yesterday, you might fail your exam tomorrow.

4) If Tom had not helped you with your math problems yesterday, you might have failed your exam tomorrow.

Is the speaker certain that the addressee will not fail their exam tomorrow?


Gratefully,
Navi

Offline admin

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Re: you might fail
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2021, 04:46:38 pm »
They are all correct but express different degrees of probability.

None express certainty about the result.
Best wishes,

Duncan

Offline Britta

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Re: you might fail
« Reply #2 on: November 16, 2021, 07:29:41 am »
In number 4 "might have failed" does not go well with "tomorrow".
If it's not used by a native speaker it's not idiomatic. And idiom trumps grammar every time. Jack Wilkerson†

Offline admin

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Re: you might fail
« Reply #3 on: November 16, 2021, 09:09:41 am »
Why not?
It predicts that, as a result of Tom helping him, the chances are that he will not fail the exam.
Best wishes,

Duncan