Author Topic: time frame / margin of time  (Read 230 times)

Offline bookworm

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time frame / margin of time
« on: April 24, 2021, 01:18:21 am »
You will see the following information when you visit their respective websites:

a) Store X: Credit card refunds can take two to three weeks.
b) Hospital Y: Blood test results are out within 48 to 72 hours.

Joe has requested a refund a few times in the past at Store X, and it has always taken a few days only. He's also had blood tests at Hospital Y, and the results have always been sent to his email account in less than 24 hours. The same is true with his friends and relatives. They haven't heard of refunds or lab results that have taken longer because these are rare cases.

For Joe, statements (a) and (b) do not make sense based on his and the experience of people he knows. He thinks, "why not just say 'several days' (for Store X) or 'less than 24 hours' (for Hospital Y)?"

Now you try to make him understand the point of the store and the hospital. Please confirm if the following sentences sound natural and if I can refer to the underlined texts above using either of the two options:
1. They give that time frame, so customers/patients won't expect to receive the refund/results earlier in case it takes longer.​
2. They give that margin of time, so customers/patients won't expect to receive the refund/results earlier in case it takes longer.​
English is my second language.

Offline admin

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Re: time frame / margin of time
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2021, 05:12:43 pm »
Yes indeed. Though I think "time frame" fits both examples well.
Best wishes,

Duncan