Author Topic: Together with vs. with  (Read 9669 times)

Offline Becket

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Together with vs. with
« on: September 13, 2013, 09:41:19 am »
1. I went to a soccer game together with my children.
2. I went to a soccer game with my children.
3. I went to a soccer game with my son.

Often the nuance is so minute I often have a hard time explaining the difference.
Someone once told me that there is particular grammar term used for the incorrect usage of  "together" and "with." And that it should be avoided.
I think no.1 refers to an accompaniment of more than one person. (together with)
I think no. 2 may have the same meaning?
I think no. 3 refers only an accompaniment of one person. (with)

Thanks in advance,

Offline Britta

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Re: Together with vs. with
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2013, 11:02:17 am »
Quote
There is particular grammar term used for the incorrect usage of  "together" and "with." And that it should be avoided.

Sentences 2 and 3 are fine. They are neutral, matter-of-fact statements. In sentence 1 "together" adds emphasis. I don't think it's wrong, it is redundant, though. But then, redundancy is a nice tool to play with for a little extra emphasis here and there. We do it all the time. Perhaps it implies that the children refused or were prevented to come on a previous occasion.
 
« Last Edit: September 13, 2013, 11:04:02 am by Britta »
If it's not used by a native speaker it's not idiomatic. And idiom trumps grammar every time. Jack Wilkerson†

Offline Becket

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Re: Together with vs. with
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2013, 11:42:32 am »
Thank you Britta.