Recent Posts

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 10
21
Language Questions / Re: all I've seen
« Last post by Penny Farthing on September 22, 2020, 06:34:18 pm »

c. I can't believe how much I have seen here today.

d. I believe only some of the things I've seen here today.

e. I can't believe anything I've seen here today.


The first two are possible. Stress and intonation will tell which is meant.

If the speaker intended the meaning of e, they would use the words of e. The original word cannot mean that.
22
Language Questions / Re: Neutral certainty and formality
« Last post by Penny Farthing on September 22, 2020, 06:00:14 pm »
I'm afraid I have nothing to dd to what I said in my earlier posts.
23
Language Questions / Re: Neutral certainty and formality
« Last post by chuliona on September 22, 2020, 04:58:28 pm »
We talk about the possibility, and whether it's actually happening or not is not a matter of concern. The intention of the speaker matters - that's how the speaker believes that the possibility of it happening is high, and therefore certain.

Iona
24
Language Questions / Re: Are Given Away Free Vs Are to be Given Away Free
« Last post by Penny Farthing on September 22, 2020, 02:19:23 pm »
In the context you have given us, nobody is going to think that the books have already been given away if you write "All books are given away free." So, either #1 or #2 is acceptable, though I'd simply say "All the books are free". I prefer all the books to all books, because the reference is to specific books that you have listed.
25
Language Questions / Are Given Away Free Vs Are to be Given Away Free
« Last post by Malcolm on September 22, 2020, 11:46:41 am »
Dear teachers,

I want to donate some books. Hence, I posted the following message on a Telegram channel after telling the members what books I have:

1. All books are given away free.

My wife, however, thinks that it should have been,

2. All books are to be given away free. (as they have not been donated to anyone yet).

I feel both sentences mean the same but she is of the view that sentence 1 connotes that the books have already been given away.

May we have your opinion, please?
26
Language Questions / Re: both of them
« Last post by admin on September 22, 2020, 10:47:08 am »
#1 is unnatural. #a expresses what that was trying to say. #b is also correct but, obviously, means something different. #c is also correct but, once again, has a different meaning. It is unnatural to use "both" in a negative way as in #1.
27
Language Questions / both of them
« Last post by navi on September 22, 2020, 10:37:49 am »
1) Both of them were not wearing hats.

I think that sentence is unusual. Would you consider it correct?

If yes, would you say that it means:

a) Neither of them was wearing a hat.
or
b) Only one of them was wearing a hat.
or
c) It is not true that both of them were wearing hats.

Gratefully,
Navi
28
Language Questions / Re: Pressure units
« Last post by Britta on September 22, 2020, 08:14:59 am »
Thanks a lot, so I probably stick with bar. Nobody complained so far, it's just the "editor" of MS Word after all.
29
Language Questions / Re: Neutral certainty and formality
« Last post by Penny Farthing on September 22, 2020, 03:55:23 am »
There is nothing certain about the message in "Let's discuss Topic X now". If the speaker is in a position of authority, then the discussion will start. If they are not, the discussion may well not start.
30
Language Questions / Re: Neutral certainty and formality
« Last post by chuliona on September 21, 2020, 04:29:47 pm »
Thanks Penny. 'Let's ...' is conversational and therefore informal. The sentence shows a high possibility of it happening and so, it's certain.  I was thinking of a sentence shows neutral certainty and formality but I couldn't think of one.

Iona

Pages: 1 2 [3] 4 5 ... 10