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Language Questions / what is she upset about
« Last post by azz on September 27, 2020, 10:01:38 am »
a. What TV series is she upset about not being produced?
b. What TV series is she most upset about not being produced?

c What TV series is she upset about not being cast in?
d. What TV series is she most upset about not being cast in?

Are the above sentences grammatically correct?

I think the first two don't work. It is the TV series that is not produced. The sentences don't make sense to me. The second pair sound fine to me. She wasn't cast in the TV series.

Many thanks.
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Language Questions / Re: Response to "How are you ?"
« Last post by arturas on September 25, 2020, 08:43:17 pm »
I agree with you, but I think I've heard this version being said when someone grew tired of repeating the same standard phrase. It's like an expression of laziness or boredom or like one is lazy to change from "Me" to "I".
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Language Questions / Re: Response to "How are you ?"
« Last post by Bertha on September 25, 2020, 11:55:09 am »
Just an added side note.  As a way of joking, my husband would say "fine as frog hair split three ways" or "fine as frog fuzz."
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Language Questions / Re: ---- I had played into the blue ones
« Last post by admin on September 24, 2020, 11:46:52 am »
No. It means that there is a sad situation - probably the person is dead.
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Language Questions / Re: Response to "How are you ?"
« Last post by admin on September 24, 2020, 11:45:37 am »
Yup.
I'm fine thanks = thanks for asking and how are you?
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Language Questions / Re: Response to "How are you ?"
« Last post by Penny Farthing on September 24, 2020, 11:09:02 am »
It would sound rather childish.
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Language Questions / Response to "How are you ?"
« Last post by arturas on September 24, 2020, 06:41:17 am »
Hello,

Can I respond to "How are you?"  just by saying "Me ? Me is fine." like a form of a joke ?
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Language Questions / ---- I had played into the blue ones
« Last post by t k on September 24, 2020, 05:42:16 am »
Finding somebody in a city if you can?t call in the cops is quite
an undertaking- I had tried it often enough back when I was a
reporter, and it takes luck and time. But one rule is always to try
the obvious first. So I went to Adam?s apartment. When I saw his
car sitting out front I figured I had played into the blue ones.
  (from All the King's Men, by Robert Penn Warren; a larger context is here; use ctrl-f to locate the sentence)

Please explain "I had played into the blue ones".  Is it related to the idiom "once in a blue moon"?  Thanks.  --- tk
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Language Questions / Re: which one
« Last post by Darryl on September 23, 2020, 01:03:59 pm »
It would seem they are all possible, though unnecessarily wordy. And I would use who for people not which.
(f) is the simplest and most natural.
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Language Questions / which one
« Last post by azz on September 23, 2020, 09:31:14 am »
a. Which one saw the accident, the tall boy or the short one?
b. Which saw the accident, the tall boy or the short one?

c. Which one saw the accident, the one called Peter or the one called John?
d. Which saw the accident, the one called Peter or the one called John?

e. Which one saw the accident, Peter or John?
f. Which saw the accident, Peter or John?


Which of the above sentences are grammatically correct?
Which are natural?

I don't like (e) or (f) that much, but I won't go so far as to call them ungrammatical.... I think the others work but these two don't... I may be wrong. I guess in all of these cases one could use 'who' instead of 'which' and 'which one'...

Many thanks.
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