Recent Posts

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1
Language Questions / Re: hands and feet
« Last post by admin on January 18, 2021, 11:20:52 am »
I think it could be either; but it is more likely (physically and conventionally!) to be the first.
2
Language Questions / Re: for the better
« Last post by admin on January 18, 2021, 11:17:23 am »
Yes
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Language Questions / for the better
« Last post by azz on January 18, 2021, 08:30:42 am »
a. Pete never showed up, which was for the better.

b. Tom came to the party, which was for the worse.

Are the above sentences grammatically correct?

Many thanks
4
Language Questions / hands and feet
« Last post by azz on January 18, 2021, 08:28:52 am »
a. The gangsters tied his hands and feet together.

Could they just have tied his hands together and his feet together, or did they tie all four limbs together?

Many thanks.
5
Language Questions / Re: could have left
« Last post by admin on January 17, 2021, 05:52:47 pm »
It really depends on context. Might is mere possibility whilst could is more physical or mental ability.
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Language Questions / Re: ---- bow-wows, cover a sixpence
« Last post by admin on January 17, 2021, 05:50:52 pm »
I have really no idea t k.

Bow-wows may mean bowels; but, what cover a sixpence might mean in that context....
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Language Questions / Re: Grammatical ?
« Last post by admin on January 17, 2021, 05:49:33 pm »
#2 is fine.

#1 should be recast something like: I asked him to wait for me (there) until I came back with the laptop.
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Language Questions / Re: a relative pronoun
« Last post by admin on January 17, 2021, 05:47:51 pm »
You understand it correctly.

Personally I would use which here. This will give you further thoughts: https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/16507/most-of-which-or-most-of-whom
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Language Questions / a relative pronoun
« Last post by Takashi on January 16, 2021, 02:08:46 pm »
I'd appreciate it if you could help me with the second sentence.

"While 88% of Swedish people speak a foreign language (usually English), only about 20% of British people speak one ( still mainly French). This means that now that it is possible for EU citizens to work anywhere within the EU, Europeans who speak good English (of which there are millions) can easily find jobs in the UK and Ireland, but it is impossible for British or Irish people to do the same unless they are in the small minority of people who speak another language. "

It says "of which there are millions," and it seems that the part means "there are millions of Europeans who speak good English." Could you tell me if it is all right to use the relative pronoun "which" to refer to people. I've been wondering why it isn't "of whom there are millions" instead of "of which there are millions"?

Thank you very much.

Takashi
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Language Questions / could have left
« Last post by navi on January 16, 2021, 08:17:27 am »
Which are correct:

1) We don't know where he is. He might have left the country.

2) We don't know where he is. He could have left the country.

3) It was fortunate we didn't go mountain climbing. We might have died in that avalanche.

4) It was fortunate we didn't go mountain climbing. We could have died in that avalanche.

Gratefully,
Navi

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