Author Topic: What is the difference  (Read 328 times)

Offline zFriend

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What is the difference
« on: March 12, 2020, 11:46:42 am »
Hello!
I have a question.
There are two sentences in a course book:
1. If you go to the fitting room, I'll bring the jeans to you.
2. I'll bring a pair [of jeans] for you to try on.
In the first case - TO, in the second - FOR. Why?

Offline admin

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Re: What is the difference
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2020, 12:11:07 pm »
to - direction
for - purpose
Best wishes,

Duncan

Offline zFriend

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Re: What is the difference
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2020, 12:19:44 pm »
Great thanks!

Offline zFriend

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Re: What is the difference
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2020, 09:46:39 am »
Hello!
Next question:
1. I give this book to you.
2. I give this book for you.
First case means something like "This book is my present. Now you are the owner of this book".
Second case means something like "You are only user of this book, not owner. This book is mine".
Right?

Offline Darryl

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Re: What is the difference
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2020, 11:49:47 am »
Not really. #1 should be I am giving …. and #2 is not natural.
To make the sentence mean what you want it to mean, you would have to change it to:
I am lending you this book to read. (This makes it clear you want it back)

Offline zFriend

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Re: What is the difference
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2020, 12:32:43 pm »
Hi, Darryl!
Quote from: Darryl
#1 should be I am giving ….
Present Continuous!

Quote from: Darryl
and #2 is not natural.
It means that this sentence is not grammatically correct?
Native speakers never say "I give/gave this book for you"?
« Last Edit: March 13, 2020, 12:35:11 pm by zFriend »

Offline Darryl

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Re: What is the difference
« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2020, 10:30:53 pm »
Yes, it's unnatural. I do not believe a native speaker would say 'I give this book for you'. At least, not this native speaker! Others may disagree.

Offline zFriend

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Re: What is the difference
« Reply #7 on: March 14, 2020, 10:36:36 pm »
Great thanks, Darryl!

I have next question. Yesterday I found an interesting post on the net: “This book is useful to me” indicates that it is useful and important to me - particularly to me not anybody else. whereas “This book is useful for me” indicates that it is useful for me in general sense. The book is useful for everyone because it is a good book and so it useful for me too but not particularly useful and important only to me.
Is it true? Is it correct?

Offline admin

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Re: What is the difference
« Reply #8 on: March 15, 2020, 12:29:11 pm »
Yes indeed.
Best wishes,

Duncan

Offline zFriend

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Re: What is the difference
« Reply #9 on: March 15, 2020, 07:04:19 pm »
Quote from: admin
Yes indeed.
Thank you!

 - We have ice-cream, coffee and apple pie.
 - Sounds very tasty to me
!
The reason of using "to" is "it is tasty to me - particularly to me not anybody else".
Am I right?

Another question:
It is a big challenge to me.  ---> It's a challenge from my point of view.
It is a big challenge for me. ---> The challenge already is waiting for me whether I like it or not.
Right?