Author Topic: to take advantage of people  (Read 136 times)

Offline bookworm

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to take advantage of people
« on: December 03, 2019, 04:29:47 pm »
When you go to medical missions, doctors and dentists normally give their service free of charge. Sometimes, there are free medicines.

I understand that you take advantage of discounts, freebies, medical missions, etc.

   Poor people in that community always took advantage of medical missions where they always get a free medical and dental assistance. They just have to buy their medicines.​

But it seems that to take advantage has a negative connotation when applied to people:

   They always took advantage of volunteer doctors and dentists whenever there are medical missions in that area.​
English is my second language.

Offline admin

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Re: to take advantage of people
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2019, 04:37:51 pm »
I do see what you mean. I don't think it applies in those circumstances but it certainly would in this example: He took advantage of John's good nature to use his car without permission.
Best wishes,

Duncan

Offline bookworm

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Re: to take advantage of people
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2019, 04:40:16 pm »
So what you're saying is that the expression itself can be neutral depending on the context like in my original post?

Thanks,
English is my second language.

Offline admin

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Re: to take advantage of people
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2019, 06:37:27 pm »
Yes, indeed.
Best wishes,

Duncan