Author Topic: ---- think after the flood  (Read 647 times)

Offline t k

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1208
---- think after the flood
« on: July 17, 2019, 02:33:37 am »
How old might this Gletkin be? Thirty-six or
seven, at the most; he must have taken part in the Civil War as
a youth and seen the outbreak of the Revolution as a mere boy.
That was the generation which had started to think after the
flood
. It had no traditions, and no memories to bind it to the
old, vanished world. It was a generation born without umbilical
cord.
  (from Darkness at Noon, by Arthur Koestler; a larger context is here; use ctrl-f to locate the sentence)

Please explain "think after the flood".  Does it mean "think as the majority think"?  Thanks.  --- tk

Offline admin

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3698
  • In the heart of Shropshire
    • Lydbury English Centre Ltd
Re: ---- think after the flood
« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2019, 10:25:32 am »
No - it means that everything stopped, the slate was wiped clean, and thinking started again.
Best wishes,

Duncan

Offline t k

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1208
Re: ---- think after the flood
« Reply #2 on: July 18, 2019, 05:45:49 am »
Thanks, Duncan.  Then can I understand "she too had grown up after the flood" in the below as meaning "she too had grown up after the revolution when everything is cleared and had restarted"?  Thanks again.  --- tk

Obviously, she too considered the mon-
strous things Gletkin was reading as quite convincing. She was
still voung, perhaps twenty-five or six; she too had grown up
after the flood
. What did the name Rubashov mean to this gen-
eration of modern Neanderthalers?

Offline admin

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3698
  • In the heart of Shropshire
    • Lydbury English Centre Ltd
Re: ---- think after the flood
« Reply #3 on: July 18, 2019, 09:26:39 am »
In that particular context - yes.
Best wishes,

Duncan