Author Topic: professor in a language school  (Read 210 times)

Offline bookworm

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professor in a language school
« on: April 15, 2019, 01:57:10 pm »
If I understand it correctly, the term professor is only applied to colleges and universities, and there is a difference between British and American English in that regard.

There is a Spanish school that refers to their teachers as professors, and I think it's mistranslated because these are false cognates. In Spanish, profesor is used to refer to teachers of primary and secondary students.

Do you agree that language school teachers should simply be called teachers, not professors?

Would you find it strange, for example, if teachers were called professors at Lydbury English Centre?
English is my second language.

Offline Darryl

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Re: professor in a language school
« Reply #1 on: April 16, 2019, 12:55:39 pm »
Perhaps Bertha is best qualified to answer that one!  ;D

Offline Britta

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Re: professor in a language school
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2019, 03:09:04 pm »
In Spanish, profesor is used to refer to teachers of primary and secondary students.

The same is true in French. In Germany not every university teacher is automatically called professor; there are quite a number of teacher levels even there. In the UK I'm not aware of school teachers being called professor.

So, if a Spanish school is writing an English article about itself it should use the Spanish spelling and perhaps put an explanation in parentheses i.e. " profesor (teacher)" . Otherwise using "teacher" is fine IMHO.
If it's not used by a native speaker it's not idiomatic. And idiom trumps grammar every time. Jack Wilkerson†

Offline admin

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Re: professor in a language school
« Reply #3 on: April 17, 2019, 09:39:27 am »
>Would you find it strange, for example, if teachers were called professors at Lydbury English Centre?
I would :)
Best wishes,

Duncan Baker
http://www.lydbury.co.uk

Offline Bertha

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Re: professor in a language school
« Reply #4 on: April 17, 2019, 11:58:34 am »
I can't speak to other systems, but in the U.S. school system, elementary through secondary (high school) levels, "teacher" is the name given to those who do the teaching.  There may be teacher or teaching assistants or aides to help teachers.  Once you move on to college and university levels, it becomes much more complicated.  Official titles vary from school, college, or university.  In technical schools, the teachers are often called "instructors" or "trainers."  At academic colleges and universities, it becomes a little murkier.  Many institutions have a hierarchy, where "professor" is the highest level of the academic instruction and a professor is usually tenured (a whole other discussion). After that, the ranks go down to Associate Professor, Assistant Professor, Instructor within the full time faculty.  Many places also have other designations, too.  I found a good breakdown and explanation from Boston University: https://www.bu.edu/handbook/appointments-and-promotions/classification-of-ranks-and-titles/   Keep in mind that there are still variations, with each place defining what is used within that institution. 
Bertha

Offline admin

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Re: professor in a language school
« Reply #5 on: April 17, 2019, 02:00:29 pm »
This gives a run down of the British version https://academicpositions.com/career-advice/uk-academic-job-titles-explained - I think!
Best wishes,

Duncan Baker
http://www.lydbury.co.uk