Author Topic: 'invented' words.  (Read 960 times)

Offline Darryl

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'invented' words.
« on: August 14, 2018, 12:01:00 pm »
Twice in the last couple of days I have heard people using words I don't think exist. I believe they work backward from a noun to a non-existent word.
Case 1: News reporter talking about endangered mammals in Tasmania and the conservation program there. He said something about how necessary it is to 'conservate' the Tasmanian devils. Conservate??
Case 2: Another nature program. Talking about the need for a varied diet for animals, the presenter said that it was necessary to 'variate' the diet.
Unless I am behind the times, pehaps bit of creative vocabulary in both examples.

Offline admin

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Re: 'invented' words.
« Reply #1 on: August 14, 2018, 06:15:12 pm »
Yup - then you have persuade and convince :(|
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Duncan Baker
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Offline t k

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Re: 'invented' words.
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2018, 05:04:02 am »
But I found these.  --- tk

----
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/conservate
http://www.yourdictionary.com/conservate

conservate
VERB
rare
with object To conserve, preserve.

----
http://www.yourdictionary.com/variate
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/variate

variate
Verb
To alter; or vary; to make different.

Offline admin

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Re: 'invented' words.
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2018, 10:55:45 am »
Variate - is main stream IMHO
Conservate - what is wrong with conserve?
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Duncan Baker
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Offline davel

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Re: 'invented' words.
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2018, 03:31:25 pm »
I think there is a term "back formation" when a noun takes on a verbal format, or vice-versa. Eventually, popular ones do become mainstream.
Davel,
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Offline davel

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Re: 'invented' words.
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2018, 03:33:39 pm »
Further to this is the use of existing words that change their part of speech. One that annoys me is the use of "below" as an adjective: "refer to the below example." I believe this to be incorrect: to me, "below" is an adverb, indicating "place where" and cannot be used as an adjective.
Davel,
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Re: 'invented' words.
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2018, 07:47:54 pm »
But... refer to the example below - would be OK presumably. Strange old world :)
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Duncan Baker
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Offline davel

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Re: 'invented' words.
« Reply #7 on: August 28, 2018, 02:41:49 pm »
Yes, "refer to the example below" is fine because there it is an adverb, answering the question "where is the example?"

I guess my ears just haven't moved on with the times which is why they protest at "the below example".
Davel,
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Re: 'invented' words.
« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2018, 03:07:20 pm »
 :D
Best wishes,

Duncan Baker
http://www.lydbury.co.uk