Author Topic: Returned  (Read 9882 times)

Offline JTL

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Re: Returned
« Reply #15 on: October 12, 2016, 02:33:42 am »
JTL:

I have been trying to introduce a thread of logic to your last posting. Do you have a phobia against aircraft toilets?.........GG

I have a phobia against any public toilet, but with the aircraft ones, I had two worries.  The extra worry was about the door.  I worried that I might not know how to open it.  However, before I left for NZ, I "researched" on the internet about aircraft toilets and became confident with the door.  The only concern after that is how not to contact the bowl....

I have to go out for breakfast now.  Discuss later if needed.

JTL

Offline Darryl

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Re: Returned
« Reply #16 on: October 12, 2016, 12:46:56 pm »
I'm with Gene! What is it about aircraft toilets that have you avoiding them so seriously? Long-haul flights would be very uncomfortable without them! And not drinking may well be damaging to your health, as pressurised aircraft cabins and aircons do tend to dehydrate the body.
I do agree though, they should devote a little more space to the bathrooms - I imagine people who are claustrophobic would find them a challenge.

Offline davel

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Re: Returned
« Reply #17 on: October 12, 2016, 01:17:20 pm »
I am always conscious of what I am going to be doing for the rest of the day as I consider how much liquid to have, especially coffee or tea. Those who are wary of toilet doors that may (or may NOT) open when you want them to would love the ones on British trains and even more the public toilets in the street where you have to insert coins to make the door slide open to let you in. On the far opposite side is one that I saw (and used!) in London one New Year's Eve - I can only describe it as being like a very large billiard table, with perhaps two dozen "holes" all in the open air. It was not at all private, but very convenient!!!
Davel,
an Anglo-American citizen of the world

Gene

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Re: Returned
« Reply #18 on: October 12, 2016, 11:12:32 pm »
The hole in the floor is still widely used around the world. I found it everywhere.........even once in France where I came across a modern, chrome plated hole in the floor. I imagine it cost more than a regular toilet. .................................GG :o

Offline davel

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Re: Returned
« Reply #19 on: October 14, 2016, 12:52:40 pm »
Another difference is "eastern" toilets that I encountered in Japan in 1990. It is sort of hard to describe, other than you face the other way when you are doing what you went in there to do.
Davel,
an Anglo-American citizen of the world

Offline admin

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Re: Returned
« Reply #20 on: October 14, 2016, 01:36:57 pm »
In old Yemeni houses, the liquid went one way and the solid went the other - to dry in the sun and be used as fuel. Very practical.

Poor old Yemen  :'(
Best wishes,

Duncan Baker
http://www.lydbury.co.uk

Gene

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Re: Returned
« Reply #21 on: October 14, 2016, 07:45:42 pm »
If my memory serves me correctly, I remember a hole in the floor toilet in North Africa which had a shower fixture suspended above. The thing could be used for both purposes. Sort of messy but I guess it worked......ugh!!!!!!!.......GG ::)

Offline JTL

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Re: Returned
« Reply #22 on: October 15, 2016, 04:52:05 am »
Gene, ask your female relatives whether they sit on the public toilet when they use one, or just bend their legs without touching the toilet seat.  I would guess that's the way most women do with public toilets.  If you don't have long legs, it is more difficult to do so.  That is why I avoid using one if possible. 

Another thing: I was very frustrated with the hotel bathrooms in 3 out of 4 hotels we stayed in in NZ.  The shower heads were fixed high up. Decades ago I encountered this type of arrangement in other countries, but I thought the world must have advanced.  Sigh~ fortunately I brought with me the following thing to use with such a bathroom, having learned from my Perth experience where I couldn't find one in all the shops I tried.


Gene

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Re: Returned
« Reply #23 on: October 15, 2016, 09:28:15 pm »
JTL:

Gene, a[bsk your female relatives whether they sit on the public toilet when they use one, or just bend t[/b]

In toilets here, there is a protective sheet of paper which is placed on the toilet seat prior to using. A person's skin does not come into contact with the physical seat. This goes for airplanes also.

As to your second item, the green pot. I am trying to visualize how you use it in conjunction with a high shower head. Would you  elucidate please...................Interesting conversation........................GG

Offline Darryl

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Re: Returned
« Reply #24 on: October 16, 2016, 12:11:17 am »
Well, Gene, I imagine that JTL would use the green pot to fill with water from the shower head and then tip it over herself. I guess if you are of smaller stature the high shower heads would be a pain. Just like low shower heads are for us taller folk.
What irks me about shower heads are those water saving doodads that squirt the water out in a fine spray that barely gets you wet. You turn up the pressure up and it's like you're getting a water blast treatment. I know we have to save water but ....

Offline Bertha

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Re: Returned
« Reply #25 on: October 16, 2016, 11:51:20 am »
Have you ever been in one of the "rain forest" type showers? Those look heavenly!

Bertha

Offline Darryl

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Re: Returned
« Reply #26 on: October 16, 2016, 01:22:44 pm »
Yep. Known as rain shower heads here - they are the ultimate.

Offline JTL

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Re: Returned
« Reply #27 on: October 17, 2016, 10:08:13 am »


My bathrooms at home have the above type of shower sets, consisting of a rain shower head and a movable one that can be taken down to point at any direction you want. The human body has nooks and crannies that a thorough cleaning requires spraying from different angles.  In every bathroom I also have a hose attached to a separate faucet for a different effect of washing.  Ironically, the water bailer/dipper/pot (whatever you call it) that I showed above is not used at home.

Gene, I had read about the protective sheet for the toilet seat but I imagine it is clumsy to use.  If you wet the paper accidentally while you are sitting on it, moisture will spread and touch your skin.  Hover is safer.

Offline Bertha

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Re: Returned
« Reply #28 on: October 17, 2016, 12:41:31 pm »
There was a recent report about the uselessness of using toilet seat covers: http://www.today.com/health/sorry-germaphobes-toilet-seat-liners-are-pointless-heres-why-1D79818408
Bertha

Offline Darryl

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Re: Returned
« Reply #29 on: October 17, 2016, 01:02:24 pm »


  In every bathroom I also have a hose attached to a separate faucet for a different effect of washing. 

Wow, JTL. How many bathrooms ya got??