Author Topic: Can you pass this test meant for 11 year olds? The minister couldn't  (Read 5110 times)

Offline admin

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3644
  • In the heart of Shropshire
    • Lydbury English Centre Ltd
Best wishes,

Duncan

Offline Darryl

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2991
  • Far North Queensland, Australia
9/10 - didn't think enough about the preposition one. A bit tough for eleven-year-olds.

Offline admin

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3644
  • In the heart of Shropshire
    • Lydbury English Centre Ltd
Daft!
Best wishes,

Duncan

Offline Britta

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 889
  • Technical writer
Same here (9/10)  :-*

I have to admit that I didn't understand question 7 (which I got wrong). Words like "subordinating" always leave me guessing what they are supposed to mean. As a non-native you don't grow up with the same grammar buzzwords, I'm afraid  ::)
If it's not used by a native speaker it's not idiomatic. And idiom trumps grammar every time. Jack Wilkerson†

Offline Bertha

  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 1142
Same here (9/10)  :-*

I have to admit that I didn't understand question 7 (which I got wrong). Words like "subordinating" always leave me guessing what they are supposed to mean. As a non-native you don't grow up with the same grammar buzzwords, I'm afraid  ::)

I missed one too, the one with "thirty seven-year-olds" since I read it as "thirty-seven-year-olds".  Because the omission of the hyphen has become so common in writing two numeral numbers (37), I over-analyzed that one.  After I went back, I saw that it should be "thirty seven-year-olds" which has become the average size of a class in many schools (30 seven-year-old students is too many to teach very effectively).

The test purported to be evaluating how well a student could use English; however, using terminology that they may or may not have been taught does not test their ability to use English well.  Heck, in U.S. schools, you might be hard pressed to find any teachers teaching terminology and/or any grammar and usage! 
Bertha