Author Topic: Thanksgiving Day  (Read 5511 times)

Gene

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Thanksgiving Day
« on: November 23, 2013, 04:01:45 pm »
Next Thursday is “Thanksgiving Day” here in the States. It is a national holiday characterized by everyone roasting a turkey. Family and friends all get together for  feasting and comraderie. The origins of Thanksgiving are dim in my memory. Perhaps Bertha, with her detective-like precision, can enlighten us on that point. At any rate, five  women from my extended family got together and are preparing a magnificent feast for the rest of us. I am simply hosting the house, the gals are doing all the cooking. Since I have a great baker nearby, I offered to provide three pies for dessert, an Apple, a Pumpkin and a Pecan, all topped with whipped cream. Next Thursday I will be groaning…………………GG

P.S. Does anything like Thanksgiving exist elsewhere in the world?.............gg

Offline Darryl

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Re: Thanksgiving Day
« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2013, 08:28:19 am »
Not in Australia, Gene.
I guess we have two holidays here which could be described as 'national holidays'. On April 25th we have Anzac Day (very solemn, lots of remembrance ceremonies) and January 26th is Australia Day (days at the beach, barbies and cricket).
We do have other holidays too - Easter and Christmas of course, as well as Queen's Birthday and Labor Day (very low profile). Each local area has a show day holiday and Victoria has its Melbourne Cup holiday.
But nothing that equates to Thanksgiving. Go easy on the those pies and whipped cream, Gene.  :P

Offline Bertha

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Re: Thanksgiving Day
« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2013, 11:49:36 am »
Here's an interesting explanation of how Thanksgiving in the U.S. is the fourth Thursday of November by law: http://history1900s.about.com/od/1930s/a/thanksgiving.htm

As to whether other countries or cultures have feast days somewhat like Thanksgiving, I am sure there are many around the world.  Many Native American tribes celebrate the harvest at various times, and some feast days are connected to the Catholic Church, too.  The idea of Thanksgiving--a harvest feast--would not have been an unusual idea for either the Pilgrims or the Wampanoag people who had helped the early settlers at Plymouth Plantation in what is now Massachusetts. 
Bertha

Offline Britta

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Re: Thanksgiving Day
« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2013, 07:33:44 am »
We don't have that in Germany. The churches celebrate a Harvest Sunday in early October but that's not a family fiest and neither is it a holiday. What Gene descrices (family gets together and eats huge amounts of food) is often celebrated at Christmas in Germany.
 
In my family we have moved that to one of the weekends before Chrismas because Christmas is, well, my birthday  8)
If it's not used by a native speaker it's not idiomatic. And idiom trumps grammar every time. Jack Wilkerson†

Offline davel

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Re: Thanksgiving Day
« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2013, 09:54:04 am »
Thanksgiving is also celebrated in Canada, in a similar fashion to the way it is celebrated in the USA. However, the Canadian holiday is the second Monday in October.

UK churches have "Harvest Festival" which is the closest we come to Thanksgiving. It is held in late September / early October. On the appointed Sunday, there is a "harvest" theme, with appropriate hymns and prayers. People are encouraged to bring in food, which is then donated to a homeless shelter / food bank. Often the Friday or Saturday of that weekend also sees a "Harvest Supper" in the church hall, with everyone coming together for a meal.

I was born in the USA but have lived in England for 16 years. My family will be celebrating Thanksgiving this coming Sunday, as Thursday is just an ordinary working day here. Some restaurants, particularly in London, are now having Thanksgiving meals on Thursday, however. I would like to now ask what specific foods you will be eating on Thanksgiving. I am often asked what food we eat, and I can speak from my own experience, but would like to know what other folk have.
David

Offline Bertha

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Re: Thanksgiving Day
« Reply #5 on: November 25, 2013, 12:16:22 pm »
I would like to now ask what specific foods you will be eating on Thanksgiving. I am often asked what food we eat, and I can speak from my own experience, but would like to know what other folk have.

Thanksgiving Menu:
  • turkey--I roast mine but some people now fix deep-fried turkey!
  • mashed potatoes
  • stuffing (aka dressing)--all sorts of varieties, but I make a bread/corn bread mix with sausage, onion, celery and seasonings including sage
  • asparagus (many choices for a veggie)
  • fruit salad made with miniature marshmallows and whipped cream
  • cranberry sauce
  • bread rolls
  • pumpkin pie

Since it's only my husband and I who are "feasting," I have a small turkey and adjust the amounts accordingly.
Bertha

Offline Darryl

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Re: Thanksgiving Day
« Reply #6 on: November 25, 2013, 10:20:03 pm »
Wow. A lot of turkeys in the U.S. on death row right now!

Offline admin

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Re: Thanksgiving Day
« Reply #7 on: November 25, 2013, 11:02:09 pm »
Soon to be followed by their British cousins at Christmas  ::)
Best wishes,

Duncan